Chapter Eighteen – “Premonition”

“V,” I announce, feeling eager, but a bit naive. “I’ve just gotten a premonition. It’s coming through presence, of course. But I’m wondering how that works. Premonition’s are about the future; presence is always in the Now.”

“The Now is always in the future.”

“What?” I blurt out. “That goes against everything you…”

“I’m joking. But in a way, I’m not. The Now is in fact the future; it is likewise the past. All time is a projection of the one timeless moment. The so-called ‘future’ is held in the bosom of the divine unknown. This is the power of destiny and creation, the power of ‘beginning again’. It is the closest thing to future that really exists, this potentiality of presence.

“You asked about how premonitions work. It is simple. There is no such thing as ‘time’ in reality. There is only what is known and what is unknown within the eternal moment. A foretelling of events to come is merely the unknown revealing itself, of becoming gradually known. It all happens within the Now. Your mind applies the notion of time and then pictures the unknown as a thing of the future.”

V pauses for a moment, then says, “Now, tell me about your premonition.”

“Oh yeah, that,” I chuckle. “I almost forgot. This is funny because you and I both have said that we write these messages spontaneously. Most often, we don’t see what’s coming until we begin typing it down. Well, in this case it’s different; I have already seen what we will be writing.”

“Yes, I see,” she replies. Tell me. And by the way, I have had the same portent as you. Let’s compare notes.”

“I’m not surprised,” I add. “We are synchronizing our awareness more and more—just like O and me. I’m guessing we’re getting ready for that incarnation together in Paris. In fact, that was part of my premonition.”

“You’re guessing right. Now tell me what you saw.”

“I sensed—in a dream this morning—that we would be writing more about presence—particularly, how it can orchestrate our lives. This seems like the culmination of all you’ve been saying about the Life of Source. Then, in another vision, I saw you and me paying a brief visit to Paris and meeting Omis there. I also saw that we would all go the Hall of Memories, the Akasha, and find the crystal vesica.”

“Anything else?” V asks.

“Yes, one more thing: I sensed that Omis would take over the narration of the final chapters.”

She laughs. “I can see my role here is about finished. You are getting almost everything I am. And you’re able to describe it in your own words. This, of course, has been the destiny all along. Presence is moving us all into this point. May presence have its way with us.”

She pauses for a moment of stillness. “Well, why don’t we get on with your dream? Come into my sub-dimension and we can do a little traveling together.” She encourages, “Like the old days.”

“What should I do?”

“Have you forgotten so soon? The ‘old days’ weren’t that long ago,” she chides, in good humor. “Simply step in.” Continue reading

Chapter Seventeen – “Dear Defender”

It is a new day. “Hi, V. Listening to a speaker this morning I had a small revelation. Perhaps you could help me elaborate on it.”

“I’ll be interested to hear what it is.”

“Well, it’s fairly unformed, but I’d like to try talking it through. The speaker was mentioning ‘outward gratification’. The words made me stop and notice. I sensed them as a kind of oxymoron; ‘outward’ seemed the opposite direction from gratification. Satisfaction, fulfillment—whatever—is more an inward function. In addition, this seems to be part of the confusion we have between doing and being.”

She asks, “Explain that last point a little more.”

“Doing’ is outward and ‘being’ is inward. Ego tries to maintain itself through doing things and having things. The soul, by contrast, places being first and knows that all else comes as a result of that—that all action and creation of forms derives from presence. Ego will never be satisfied for long. What it ‘does’ doesn’t last, if it has no traction in being; forms come and go. When ego is looking for fulfillment in forms, it will inevitably be disappointed. That’s what I would call ‘looking outside for gratification’.”

V answers, “I agree, basically. However, our being does encompass everything—inner and outer. The soul desires both outward, form experience and inward, formless realization. Though you didn’t say it this way, you implied the ego’s actual fear of the inner experience. It does not want to be brought into contact with the soul’s world.”

“Why would that be?” I interrupt. “Why can’t the ego get along with the soul?”

“Hah, a very good question. It has to do with fear, of course, and delusion. The ego is not comfortable with its own existence; it senses it is at great risk in the whole process of awakening. Inner depth of being frightens it intensely. It wants to stay on the surface of experience, manipulating the past and the future mental constructs. They have no depth; they only spread thinly out onto the veneer of time. It knows that the living moment is a ‘dangerous’ portal into the inner reaches of authentic being, where it might just be extinguished. Ego has an investment in staying superficial and not being authentic.”

“OK. I get that, but why can’t ego be retrained to accept authenticity and reality—and depth?”

“It can be. But what happens in that training is that the ego eventually becomes so transparent as not to exist anymore. It dissolves into the soul presence. To the ego, that looks like death, not just transparency.”

“Ah, back to my favorite subject—finding death!” I suddenly wonder, “Excuse me, but what good would ego even be if it were transparent? What would a transparent ego be like? What would it do?” Continue reading

‘Interstellar’ the Movie. Imagination In Pure Awakening

I’ve recently seen the film ‘INTERSTELLAR.’ Twice. The first time I saw it I resonated with the concept so much that I felt my future self had already experienced this and was awakening these memories inside me. I needed to see it again and invited Robert to share the experience. He had seen it once as well and was more than eager to join me. As the movie did the first time, it left me with such a lasting dream that I am still reeling from its effects.
There is a full page ad for the film in today’s NY Times, and to my surprise the studio used an OpEd by Conservative Political Columnist David Brooks, describing the film in the best way possible. I post his piece below and would bow to his intuitive nature, for Mr. Brooks is right on the mark.
OP-ED COLUMNIST

Love and Gravity

NOVEMBER 20, 2014
David Brooks

Most Hollywood movies are about romantic love, or at least sex. But Christopher Nolan’s epic movie “Interstellar” has almost no couples, so you don’t get the charged romance you have in normal movies where a man and a woman are off saving the world.

Instead, there are the slightly different kinds of love, from generation to generation, and across time and space.

The movie starts on a farm, and you see a grandfather’s love for his grandkids and the children’s love for their father. (Mom had died sometime earlier).

The planet is hit by an environmental catastrophe, and, in that crisis, lives are torn apart. The father, played by Matthew McConaughey, goes off into space to find a replacement planet where humanity might survive. The movie is propelled by the angry love of his abandoned daughter, who loves and rages at him for leaving, decade after decade.

On top of that, there is an even more attenuated love. It’s the love humans have for their ancestors and the love they have for the unborn. In the movie, 12 apostles go out alone into space to look for habitable planets. They are sacrificing their lives so that canisters of frozen embryos can be born again in some place far away.

Nolan wants us to see the magnetic force of these attachments: The way attachments can exert a gravitational pull on people who are separated by vast distances or even by death. Their attention is riveted by the beloved. They hunger for reunion.

When the McConaughey character goes into space he leaves behind the rules of everyday earthly life and enters the realm of quantum mechanics and relativity. Gravity becomes variable. It’s different on different planets. Space bends in on itself. The astronauts fly through a wormhole, a fold in the universe connecting one piece of space with another distant piece.

Most important, time changes speed. McConaughey is off to places where time is moving much more slowly than it is on Earth, so he ends up younger than his daughter. Once in the place of an ancestor, he becomes, effectively, her descendant.

These plotlines are generally based on real science. The physicist Kip Thorne has a book out, “The Science of Interstellar,” explaining it all. But what matters in the movie is the way science and emotion (and a really loud score) mingle to create a powerful mystical atmosphere.

Nolan introduces the concept of quantum entanglement. That’s when two particles that have interacted with each other behave as one even though they might be far apart. He then shows how people in love display some of those same features. They react in the same way at the same time to the same things.

The characters in the movie are frequently experiencing cross-cutting and mystical connections that transcend time and space. It’s like the kind of transcendent sensation you or I might have if we visited an old battlefield and felt connected by mystic chords of memory to the people who fought there long ago; or if we visited the house we grew up in and felt in deep communion with people who are now dead.

Bloggers have noticed the religious symbols in the movie. There are those 12 apostles, and there’s a Noah’s ark. There is a fallen angel named Dr. Mann who turns satanic in an inverse Garden of Eden. The space project is named Lazarus. The heroine saves the world at age 33. There’s an infinitely greater and incorporeal intelligence offering merciful salvation.

But this isn’t an explicitly religious movie. “Interstellar” is important because amid all the culture wars between science and faith and science and the humanities, the movie illustrates the real symbiosis between these realms.

More, it shows how modern science is influencing culture. People have always bent their worldviews around the latest scientific advances. After Newton, philosophers conceived a clockwork universe. Individuals were seen as cogs in a big machine and could be slotted into vast bureaucratic systems.

But in the era of quantum entanglement and relativity, everything looks emergent and interconnected. Life looks less like a machine and more like endlessly complex patterns of waves and particles. Vast social engineering projects look less promising, because of the complexity, but webs of loving and meaningful relationships can do amazing good.

As the poet Christian Wiman wrote in his masterpiece, “My Bright Abyss,” “If quantum entanglement is true, if related particles react in similar or opposite ways even when separated by tremendous distances, then it is obvious that the whole world is alive and communicating in ways we do not fully understand. And we are part of that life, part of that communication. …”

I suspect “Interstellar” will leave many people with a radical openness to strange truth just below and above the realm of the everyday. That makes it something of a cultural event.

Reprinted from the New York Times – The Opinion Pages, November 20, 2014

Chapter Sixteen – “Greater Than The Sum”

I can feel V reaching out to me, this instant, across the centuries. She whispers, “Now would you please go back to your account of what is ‘greater than the sum of the parts’.”

“All right. I had just about forgotten that.” I stop and ponder. “Let’s see. I guess I’d say if we add our experience to the whole of creation, the result must become greater than the whole, the former whole. Yet it seems that that would be impossible—the whole of anything is the entirety of it. There can’t be more wholeness. Yet there seems to be more, especially when you add in free will and independent awareness. This is a paradox. Maybe the whole isn’t exactly increasing; maybe it’s just changing, maturing. Is that what evolution is?”

“Of course. But let me challenge your mind yet again and say that the ‘whole’ does truly increase!”

“What?” I resist.

“The ‘whole’ that you are thinking of does not exist in reality. It is just a thoughtform held inside your mental equipment. The true ‘All That Is’ has never been constrained by mind; it is not relegated to the boundaries of a finite definition. It is infinite, boundless, continuously in a state of beginning, opening, and transcending. It perpetually spreads its being outward and inward—and, especially into here-now. It does this forever in all dimensions and directions. That is why it is synonymous with the Void. There is nothing that could constrain or contain it. Nothingness is its home and its true nature.

“If we look at the mental concept of the ‘whole’, paradox will always arise and undermine the mind. The whole does then grow,” V submits. “It is never the same from one instant to the next. When you add to this understanding that all the endless growth is happening in the one and only moment of timelessness, the mind is simply at a loss; it cannot know what is really going on. The unknown is what lies beyond the sum of the parts. It is the source of transcendence, and what determines the growth of the whole.

“Losing your mind in the maze of apprehension is the beginning point for true knowing and, at the same time, for embracing the unknown. It is a portal for joining awareness with consciousness. We can call this perception ‘the other awareness’ or ‘the intuition’ or ‘super-sentience’; it matters not what we call it, really. We might just as well call it ‘Mildred’ or ‘Marvin’; whatever word we use will only be a pointer and placeholder until your language evolves to embrace it. This joining of awareness with consciousness is what triggers the awakening; it is the desire and destiny of every fiber of your being.”

I chuckle at the idea of calling the higher awareness ‘Mildred’. “May I ask why you or O or Omis have not given us the word for this new phenomenon in awareness? Surely it must exist in your time.”

“Yes, it does. And we have given it to you in various disguised forms. We just haven’t spelled it out for you. That part is yours to claim, not ours to dictate. Evolution demands this of us all.”

“That makes sense,” I muse. “It is a very important concept—sort of pivotal and all. I guess we need to really own it in our own right.”

“Indeed. And now, let your mind consider this: Before the Big Bang, all time, space, energy and matter were confined to a tiny point. Since that ancient, original explosion, the universe has unceasingly expanded. The whole of Life has done the same. The Life of Source has not ceased to create and to multiply its inclusiveness and wholeness. Out of nothing has come everything and everything, ever more. That which was whole, and will always be whole, has unceasingly increased—both in quantity and quality. This is the mystery—the unknown—of the creation of fullness out of emptiness. As this eternal, incalculably powerful process unfolds, the Source is made manifest in Life. Continue reading

Chapter Fifteen – “Dimensions of Form”

V speaks in a more professorial tone, “Let me offer a theory for your consideration. In the progression from formlessness to form—spirit to matter—there is a gradual crossover from one to the other—from Oneness to individuality—and back out again. It is cyclical. There is a scale of gradated immersion into the material plane—varying degrees of physicality. The electron and other subatomic particles, for example, are less material—more formless—than the atom; the atom is less material than the molecule; the molecule less material than the cell. By the time we ascend outward to the level of our daily experience, matter is fully formed and as dense as it gets.

“Our individuated scale is the densest of all—the apotheosis of matter; conversely you can say we are the nadir of spirit. At the same time, we are in a middle range of dimensionality. If we ascend the scale up and outwardly beyond ourselves—to the planets, stars, and galaxies, the essence thins out and begins to return toward formlessness—away from the dense material manifestation. By the time you get to the level of the whole known universe, form begins to vanish again altogether, into formlessness. You can literally see this when you gaze out at the night sky. The indigo blackness of outer space is the infinite face of formlessness; it is the Threshold of the Void.

“In a similar vein, the neo-platonic philosophers of the Renaissance held that ‘man is the center of creation’ dimensionally—that is, equally small and large referenced to the range of cosmic and atomic perspectives.

“Consciousness frames all this progression of density and dimensionality, ranging to the outermost and innermost thresholds of formation. It both gives form to energy and receives energy back out of form. On the human scale, we live out our incarnate lives within the densest material level. But Life is not limited to just our level; Life exists throughout all echelons—great and small—throughout all dimensions.

“Your human sciences cannot accept that galaxies are alive, for instance. But they are. Likewise, Life is intimately present in the tiniest subatomic particles. You cannot tell these forms are alive, because you cannot measure Life. At these other—greater or lesser—levels, Life is much less dense, much more spacious; it is also more timeless.”

I shake my head, concerned. “This is a bizarre theory. I’ve never heard anything like it. I’ve heard of the involution of spirit into matter, but this size thing is a whole new twist. How can you say a planet is less dense than a human being?” Continue reading

Chapter Fourteen – “Presence Does All The Work”

As I try to meditate this morning, thoughts are on the rampage, thrusting and exploding everywhere in my mind; they repeatedly capture my attention. I’m swallowed up for a time. Finally, I decide to just let them be. Don’t try to stop the thoughts. Awareness falls back into sporadic observation. I’m alert enough at least to be curious about what is capturing me. In that modicum of alertness, a subtle shift happens in what I’m able to register. Ah. This is food for a question to V.

“V,” I abruptly inquire. “Please tell me about how thoughts capture my mind and attention so quickly and thoroughly. I’ve just been ravaged by them, trying to sit quietly and meditate.”

“This is a natural human condition,” she answers just as promptly as I have asked.

“Sorry for this sudden inquiry. Good morning, V, dear friend and mentor,” I apologize.

“No apology necessary. It must be vexing to feel like a victim to mental processes. Tell me what you have observed.”

“Well, I’m glad you asked. But I haven’t actually thought about it yet.”

“Go ahead then, now. Think about thinking. Observe your observation. Be clear.”

I ponder. “I guess I’m trusting that, as I describe this to you, it will become clearer. The act of focusing awareness makes it clearer.”

“No doubt it does, as you stay present.”

“When I was watching the thoughts wrangle around across the screen of my mental ‘theater’, I began to realize they weren’t outside or above me; they were right inside me—up close and very personal. I’ve heard numerous meditation teachers say, ‘look at thoughts as clouds floating across the sky.’ Well, that’s a nice maxim, but it doesn’t describe what I was experiencing. Those thoughts were right inside my head, beating on my attention—from the inside. They did an excellent job of masquerading as me. It felt like they had taken over my whole awareness.”

“Still, you were able to detach somewhat and observe them. Correct?”

“Yes. Well, I could observe them, but I wouldn’t say I could ‘detach’ from them. As soon as I relaxed, the thoughts came streaming back and submerged me. I was them again at that point. It wasn’t like I could even catch them sneaking back. They would just suddenly be there, in me and around me, using me—and I was unaware of anything else. This is not like little puffy, white clouds drifting in the blue sky. They were more like tornadoes churning between my ears.”

“That’s a good analogy. I understand. There are indeed thoughts that are like puffy little clouds, but there are also many of the like you describe. Even if they are ‘constructive’ thoughts—helping you plan events or solve problems—your mental apparatus works to impress them upon your awareness strenuously and completely; it wants your full attention. Your sentience is picked up like bits of straw in a storm. Am I right? You feel as though you are inside your thoughts more than they are inside you.”

“Exactly. You must have been human once!”

V smiles. “Yes, more than once. I can remember thoughts behaving this way. Let me help you out a little.”

“Please do.” Continue reading

Chapter Thirteen – “Let’s Begin”

“Begin again,” I say, teasing. “I think it’s funny we’re halfway through this book and you’re saying, ‘let’s begin’. But I do get it.”

“You are absolutely clear in your observation. We are continually beginning. This writing is an example of that, if nothing else. What I would begin again here is an appreciation of Life, an honoring of Source. Reverence is certainly due. But it cannot be heavy and ponderous—never too serious.”

“Sometimes I don’t know what’s too serious and what’s not serious enough.”

V answers, “That’s all part of learning to discern. Presence will help you with that. In fact, it will help you with everything.”

“It helps with everything! I like that. That feels right. Can you explain how this works? Are presence and Life the same things? What’s the difference, if any? And what about the ‘moment’ and ‘stillness’? Is it all the same?”

“Not the same. It is rather all one, only with nuanced surfaces. These words are indeed synonyms to be sure, but each concept represents a slightly different quality or degree. This is the nature of words and ideas in general; it is the same for all individuated forms. There is never any exact redundancy or duplication. Source provides the essence of uniqueness in each element of creation. Each incarnated soul has its own qualities, talents and experiences that are not to be found in the same configuration in anyone else or any thing else.

“The term ‘presence’ implies ‘being-in-the-present’ and being in the quality of consciousness, while ‘the Now’ connotes the overarching and foundational embrace of timelessness and eternity; the ‘moment’ represents the subtle momentum and movement of presence within the Now. It can be seen in tiny proportion or on a grand scale. ‘Spaciousness’ is another synonym that adds the quality of dimensionality; it also introduces us to a sense of the emptiness.

“‘Stillness’ plays a similar role. It links us directly into the Void, where all forms and actions cease; there they are swallowed up into the pre-creative formlessness and potentiality essence. It brings awareness of the raw, simple power of Source in Life. Within stillness lies the bottomless well of wonderment and infinite eternity.

“Life, like presence, speaks of motive essence, intelligence and vitality, with the added qualities of divinity and cosmic nature. It supports and infuses itself into all aspects of spirit and manifested forms. I have only said a small bit about each of these ideas here. Bear in mind that they all have much more depth that can and will be explored by you later. Plant them all into seed-links.” Continue reading